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Professor Richard Mellanby

BSc BVMS PhD DSAM DipECVIM-CA FRCVS

Fellowship Board Election 2020 Vice-Chair candidate Professor Richard MellanbyCandidate 4 of 4

 

Proposers

Professor Dylan Clements, Professor David Argyle

 

Candidate Biography

I graduated from the University of Glasgow in 1998 and after working in small animal practice, I completed a three year residency in Small Animal Medicine at the University of Cambridge which resulted in the award of the RCVS Certificate and then Diploma in Small Animal Medicine together with the ECVIM Diploma in Companion Animal Medicine. I was awarded a Wellcome Trust Fellowship in 2003 to undertake a PhD on immune regulation in a murine model of diabetes at the University of Cambridge before moving to the University of Edinburgh in 2007. I worked as a clinical fellow for 2 years before being awarded a second Wellcome Trust Fellowship in 2008 to further develop my studies into the regulation of immune tolerance which continued following the award of a third, five year Wellcome Trust Fellowship to explore the factors which drive an autopathogenic T cell response. I was appointed Head of Small Animal Medicine at R(D)SVS in 2012 before being promoted to Head of Companion Animal Sciences in 2016. I have been Head of Veterinary Clinical Research since 2012 and am currently Deputy Head of School (Academic) at R(D)SVS. I was awarded a personal chair in Comparative Medicine in 2017.

 

Candidate Statement

Since graduating I have spent my career devoted to the provision of clinical care, discovery and mentorship. I passionately believe in the capacity of the veterinary profession to deliver vast and wide ranging benefits to society through the remarkable diverse roles we can play. My own career, involving the delivery of primary and referral clinical care, undertaking research ranging from mechanistic research in tractable murine models through to applied clinical research and as an educator of both under- and postgraduate students, reflects the diverse roles veterinarians can play in wider society. It is this diversity and capacity to discovery and mentor across such wide domains that makes our professional role so important in contemporary society.

During these turbulent and difficult times, clear and effective leadership is required to ensure current challenges are safely circumvented and new opportunities grasped. The need for veterinarians across sectors to collaborate has never been stronger to ensure our profession continues to be held in high regard by the public. In addition, the need for the veterinary profession to reach out to other non-veterinary academic and industrial partners is equally pressing in order to capture some of the extraordinary opportunities which exist to advance the health of both humans and animals.

The profession is changing at a remarkable place including the financial structure of veterinary practices and the way in which veterinary education is delivered. The redevelopment of the FRCVS as a leadership brand within the profession was timely but it needs to learn rapidly from other learned societies who are highly effective at providing a respected and authoritative voice on challenging and often controversial issues which are of clear societal concern. I believe my wide range of skills and experiences across many disciplines could be of significant value to the FRCVS leadership team.

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